The fallen resistance fighters in the dutch province of Limburg
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The fallen resistance fighters in the dutch province of Limburg

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Geestelijken

Geestelijken – 29 pers.   ⇒All the fallen resistance people in Limburg
Beckhoven, van
Gerardus
Pater Beatus
∗ 1899-09-21
Amsterdam
† 1945-03-20
Bergen-Belsen
Heerlen - L.O. - priest - Father Beatus OFM, refugee helper with an extensive network. He was in fact the hub of the resistance in Heerlen, who had contact with everyone and thus enabled cooperation between a wide variety of people. Click on “Heerlen” above to read more about it.
More in our story Resistance in Valkenburg
wall: left, row 15-02
Berix,
Jan Willem
Giel
∗ 1907-04-12
Meers
† 1945-03-13
Bergen-Belsen
Heerlen - L.O. - priest - person in hiding - During the first days of September 1943 he founded the L.O.-district Heerlen with others. Became district leader after rector had withdrawn for health reasons. See also the special page on this website.
More in our story Resistance in Valkenburg
Jan Willem Berix op de lijst van personen die tijdens de bezetting belangrijk waren voor Valkenburg.
wall: left, row 15-04
Boorn, van den
E.A.G.
∗ 1911-07-04
Maastricht
† 1944-11-05
Effeld, Kr. Geilenkirchen
Posterholt - L.O. - priest - Eugène Alphonse Georges van den Boorn was rector in Posterholt near Roermond. A. van den Akker s.j.writes on heiligen.net: “He protested during the Second World War against the deportation of people and the theft of livestock by the German occupiers. He called this a violation of international law and humanity. On Sunday, October 29, 1944, the Feast of Christ the King, he was arrested. That morning he had preached on the words of Jesus, ‘My kingdom is not of this world.’ That evening he was taken home and locked in the cellar while the slurring soldiers drank his wine. A little later they picked up Rector van den Boorn, took him to the German village of Effelt, sentenced him to death in a show trial and executed the sentence the same day. Rector van den Boorn was neither canonized nor beatified.”
In Effeld, just over the border near Herkenbosch, there was a Gestapo command. The commander was Wilhelm Lammertz from Eschweiler. He also had the resistance fighters Pierre Gruijters and Ab Schols shot.
wall: right, row 03-02
Goossens,
Emile A.F.
∗ 1903-01-21
Venlo
† 0000-00-00
Bergen-Belsen
Echt - L.O. - priest - person in hiding - Vicar in Echt 1936-1945. For allied pilots, Jewish fellow citizens and resistance fighters in hiding, he set up escape routes as far away as Belgium and northern France. “In early 1944, chaplain Goossens had to go into hiding, because there were well-founded suspicions that the SiPo was watching him. After some wandering, he finally ended up with J. Simmelink in Nunhem through the intervention of Father Damen. There he was arrested by coincidence on June 29, 1944.“ Cammaert III, p. 210. See also chapter VIb, p. 625
wall: left, row 07-01
Helwegen,
Frans
∗ 1910-09-22
Roermond
† 1945-02-13
Buchenwald
Roermond - priest - Frans Marie Joseph Helwegen was a roman catholic priest of the eastern rite in Lithuania. Therefore, he was considered an agent of the West by the Soviets.
Frans Marie Joseph Helwegen buvo rytų apeigų katalikų kunigas Lietuvoje. Todėl sovietai jį laikė Vakarų agentu. 1944 m. rugpjūčio 29 d. jis buvo suimtas Mastrichte. Ką jis padarė, kad išprovokavo nacių neapykantą?
Regina Laukaitytė: «F . Helwegen (1910–1945) – a Dutchman who, in Būčys’ words, spoke Russian fast and easily yet very incorrectly. He finished the Russicum College and was ordained an Eastern Rite priest in 1935. He graduated in theology from the Pontifical Gregorian University with a licentiate degree and was appointed to the mission in Kaunas in June 1937. When the Soviets occupied Lithuania, he was arrested and transported to Moscow. As a foreign citizen he was spared repression and could return to Lithuania. In January 1942 (1943 according to other sources) he left Lithuania for Holland, where he was arrested by the Nazis. He perished in Buchenwald.» (Regina Laukaitytė, Greek Rite Catholicism in Lithuania: The Mission of Bishop Petras Būčys, 1930–1940 from: Occasional Papers on Religion in Eastern Europe, Volume 36|Issue 2, Article 2, March 2016, George Fox University, p. 12;)
What did he do to incur the hatred of the Nazis?
Do you know more? Write us!
wall: right, row 07-02
Hendrix,
Jan Jozef
∗ 1901-03-09
Grubbenvorst
† 1945-02-09
Buchenwald
Maasbracht - L.O. - priest - Grew up in Geysteren. In 1927 chaplain in Maasbracht. Traces of War (see link below) calls him headmaster. Together with his cousin G. Hermkens, chaplain in Montfoort, he was arrested on December 17, 1944 while leading people through the front (front crossing). (Cammaert VIb p. 629) But in Het grote gebod, (The Great Commandment) p. 327, we read: “Arrested on 17 December 1944 at the home of his cousin Hermkens.”
wall: left, row 27-02
Hermkens,
Gerardus
∗ 1903-01-05
Venlo
† 1945-02-18
Buchenwald
Montfort - L.O. - priest - The L.O. at Montfort was led by H. Seegers and Vicar Gerardus Hendrikus Hubertus Hermkens. On December 16, 1944, the Ardennes Counteroffensive begins, a.k.a. Battle of the Bulge. So the Allies withdraw many troops from Limburg to reinforce the Ardennes. Therefore, 30 civilians leave Montfort through the lines to the liberated area. Vicar Hermkens organized this march with the help of his contacts with the resistance. He and his cousin, Rector J.J. Hendrix of Beek-Maasbracht, who had taken shelter with Hermkens after his evacuation, were arrested by treason on December 17, 1944. The two clergymen ended up in Buchenwald. On February 8, 1945, both were seriously injured in a bombing raid on a factory where they worked. Hendrix died on February 9, Hermkens nine days later. (Cammaert VI, p. 629)
wall: left, row 38-04
Hoogendijk,
Herman Charles Joseph
∗ 1897-01-24
Den Haag
† 1945-04-10
Buchenwald
Roermond - L.O. - priest - From 1935 he was a Dutch Reformed pastor in Roermond. Married, 4 children. Member of LO-Roermond, also representative of the NSF (Nationaal Steunfonds = National Support Fund), an underground fund originally for families of sailors abroad, later, headed by Walraven van Hall, also for people in hiding such as Jews, families of prisoners, etc.
In the autumn of 1944, Rev. Hoogendijk and his family had to leave the vicarage at Roersingel in Roermond because this part of the city had to be cleared for the German Wehrmacht. He found shelter with members of his community, who also had two English pilots in the house.
On the night of December 16, 1944, the police saw a light in the house. The residents were able to escape, but the two pilots and Rev. Hoogendijk were found and taken away. No one believed him that he had nothing to do with it. Also, a banned paper was found in his clothes. So he was kept there with his wife and eldest daughter and taken across the German border for further interrogation.
After the release of his wife and daughter, he first ended up in prison in Mönchen-Gladbach and then in the Buchenwald concentration camp. There his strength rapidly diminished.
At the beginning of April he was still seen walking bent over through the camp, but on April 4, 1945 he was taken to the infirmary. He died there soon after.
Actually, when he was arrested, he already had been wanted for a long time.
wall: right, row 06-04
Houben,
Hubertus Petrus Hermanus
Sjeng
∗ 1915-07-09
Eys, gem. Wittem
† 1945-05-19
Ludwigslust
Wittem - L.O. - priest - Hubertus Petrus Hermanus Houben was vicar in Epen and head of the Catholic Action. He administered charity funds in the L.O. district of Gulpen, along with the vicars Wermeling and Penders and with Jaques Knops and Sjeng Coenen, until Penders took it over alone. He was arrested at the Strike of Wittem on July 21, 1944. Shortly after his liberation, he died in Ludwigslust (Mecklenburg) as a result of his ordeal in the Neuengamme concentration camp. Buried in the Catholic cemetery in Eys.
wall: right, row 39-05
Jacobs,
Karel
Père Hugues /Pater Hugo
∗ 1900-11-17
Antwerpen
† 1943-10-09
Bunnik (Utrecht)
This person is not (yet?) listed on the walls of the chapel. - Belgium - early resistance - press - Group Erkens - priest - He was not a resistance fighter in the Dutch province of Limburg, but was in close contact with them and therefore also appears on this list. His resistance activity began by helping escaped French prisoners of war to continue their escape. He was a Cistercian monk in the Abbey of Val-Dieu and was ordained priest on October 21, 1932. He then taught church history at Val-Dieu, was curator of the abbey museum and novice master. He and his confrere Stephanus Muhren, whom he trained, were active in the Clarence intelligence network (dr. Jules Goffin from Fouron-le-Comte) and active in the by Clarence people so called group Holland (of Nic. Erkens, at the time in hiding wirh his sisters in Sittard). Val-Dieu and the Fouron villages are located in the middle of the Liège-Maastricht-Aachen tri-border area and were therefore predestined to serve as hubs for escape networks. The two monks hid fugitives in the monastery and on the surrounding farms and watched the German transport activity on the rail lines of the border area. They were assisted by their German abbot, Alberich Steiger, who, among other things, banqueted with high German officers. Together with Fr. Hugo and Pol Nolens, vicar at Charneux, a clandestine newspaper reproduced with a spirit duplicator at Charneux was distributed, denouncing the misdeeds of National Socialism in the three national languages (La Tribune Libre in French, Het Vrije Woord in Dutch, and Das Freie Wort in German).
Arrested on March 19, 1943, the day after Fr. Stephen was arrested by the Geheime Feldpolizei (Secret Field Police) as a result of the Hannibal game, Fr. Hugo Jacobs was subjected to harsh interrogations in Liège in an attempt (unsuccessfully) to extract from him a confession about the abbot’s complicity or involvement. On August 11, 1943, he and ten others were sentenced to death by a court-martial in Utrecht for espionage and favoring the enemy. They were shot in Fort Rijnauwen near Utrecht on October 9, 1943. On the way to the execution site, he and his confrere wore their white Cistercian monk’s robes and loudly sang a religious hymn. His body was cremated, and the ashes were later buried in the abbey cemetery. A memorial plaque commemorates him in Fort Rijnauwen and in the abbey church of Val-Dieu.
This person is not (yet?) listed on the walls of the chapel.02-03
Jong, de
Henk
∗ 1911-10-20
Wijmbretseradeel
† 1945-02-12
Haarlem
Venlo - local contact - press - NV - priest - person in hiding - In 1940, Hendrik Roelof de Jong was appointed pastor of the Reformed Church in Venlo. He was co-editor of the illegal newspaper Trouw and a collaborator of the Nationaal Steun Fonds (National Support Fund, a Dutch resistance organization that financed the rest of the resistance). From September 1943, he arranged foster care in the Venlo region for rescued Jewish children from the crèche across the street from the Hollandsche Schouwburg in Amsterdam. LO contact person for Protestants in hiding in North Limburg. In 1944 he himself went into hiding with an aunt in Amsterdam. Arrested on January 27, 1945, he was executed with seven others on Monday afternoon, February 12, 1945, near the Jan Gijzen bridge in Haarlem, where a gunfight had taken place two days earlier, killing a German field gendarme. (Venlo Registry Office, document 468/1945). Cemetery of honor in Bloemendaal, field 35.
In Venlo four clergymen paid for their resistance with their lives. On the memorial plaque at the catholic Martinus Church we find the names of three priests of this church and also that of the protestant priest Henk de Jong.
wall: right, row 28-05
Knops,
Hubert Maria
∗ 1888-08-05
Heerlen
† 1944-04-23
Echt
This person is not (yet?) listed on the walls of the chapel. - Echt - L.O. - priest - Parish priest of Koningsbosch, municipality of Echt. Arrested 29 February 1944 for helping people in hiding.


This person is not (yet?) listed on the walls of the chapel.04-18
Lochtman,
Hein
∗ 1911-09-02
Kerkrade
† 1945-02-27
Bergen Belsen
Kerkrade - Maastricht - L.O. - priest - Vicar in Limmel from 1940 and member of LO in Maastricht. He hid people in hiding. On May 10, 1944, he was arrested as a result of betrayal by Aldegonda (Gonnie) Zeguers-Boere and so mistreated that he was unconscious for a long time. See also: The Betrayal of Maastricht
On September 5, 1944, he arrived in the Sachsenhausen concentration camp near Oranienburg, where he was forced to work in the Heinkel aircraft factory. When the Red Army approached, he was evacuated to Bergen-Belsen, where he died. In 1982 he was posthumously awarded the Verzetsherdenkingskruis (Memorial Cross of the Resistance).
On the wall of the chapel in Valkenburg is also written under Kerkrade a Hein Lochtman. Probably the same person.
wall: left, row 33-04
Lochtman,
Hein
∗ 0000-00-00
† 0000-00-00
Kerkrade - Maastricht - L.O. - priest - Hein Lochtman ?
wall: left, row 25-03
Merkx,
Adrianus Hubertus Josef
broeder Valentinus
∗ 1892-08-13
Hooge en Lage Zwaluw
† 1945-03-31
Bergen-Belsen
Weert - priest - On June 21, 1944, a meeting of the leaders of the L.O. Province of Limburg took place at the Boys’ Boarding School of St. Louis (of the Brothers of the Immaculate Conception of Mary, also called Brothers of Maastricht) at the Korenmarkt in Weert. At least one representative from each district was present. Since this meeting was betrayed, most of the participants fell into the hands of the SiPo (Security Police). This event was to go down in history as the Raid of Weert or the Betrayal of Weert. Brother Valentinus, as the monastic and boarding school director Merx was called, knew nothing about this meeting and had nothing to do with the L.O.. But he was arrested anyway and died in Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in mid-March 1945.
In the Rumoldus Chapel in Weert hangs a bronze plaque in memory of Brother Valentinus by the Maastricht sculptor Charles Vos. Initially, this work of art hung in the St.-Louis boarding school, but later, when the boarding school was demolished, the brothers donated it to the Rumoldus Chapel.
wall: right, row 37-01
Meulendijks,
Johannes
pater Christofoor
∗ 1895-11-16
Asten
† 0000-00-00
Bergen-Belsen
Venlo - priest - Father Christofoor was vicar at St. Martinus Church in Venlo and a member of the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts (ss.cc.). He was arrested on May 1, 1944, and imprisoned in Maastricht. On June 8, 1944, to Herzogenbusch concentration camp (Dutch: Kamp Vught). On September 6 to Sachsenhausen in Oranienburg. On February 6, 1945 to Bergen-Belsen. He is mentioned on the monument De Gevallen Mens in Asten.
Three priests of the catholic Martinus Church paid for their resistance with their lives. On the memorial plaque at this church we find their names and also that of the Protestant priest Henk de Jong
wall: right, row 29-02
Moonen,
J. Leo
ome Leo
∗ 1895-08-31
Heerlen
† 1945-04-02
Bergen-Belsen
Roermond - L.O. - priest - carillon - Secretary of the diocese. He was the spiritual advisor and so one of the de facto leaders of the Catholic resistance in the Dutch province of Limburg. He thus also had an influence on the liquidation of traitors. In his opinion, this should be avoided as far as possible. But if it was really unavoidable, he gave his consent. On August 28, 1944, he was taken to the Herzogenbusch concentration camp, better known as camp Vught. Then he came to Bergen-Belsen via Sachsenhausen. Dr. Fred Cammaert said in his speech at the unveiling of the plaque on Peace Carillon: “Leo Moonen, Bishop Lemmens’ secretary and the driving force behind the church-inspired and stimulated nonviolent resistance. Moonen maintained close contacts with many members of the resistance movement and also acted as a source of information and as an advisor. Many turned to him when difficult decisions had to be made. For example, about the elimination of traitors. Moonen followed the resistance closely and made sure that it did not develop in an aggressive direction. The irony of fate was that in August 1944 he was betrayed by a notorious NSB member from Roermond, which at his insistence was not allowed to be liquidated. At the beginning of 1945, the spiritual leader of the Limburg resistance died in the Bergen-Belsen camp".
Bearer of the Verzetskruis 1940–1945 (Cross of Resistance, one of the highest awards in the Netherlands, was awarded only 95 times)
wall: right, row 08-03
Muhren,
Piet
Père Étienne /Pater Stephanus
∗ 1908-09-14
Bergen-op-Zoom
† 1943-10-09
Bunnik (Utrecht)
This person is not (yet?) listed on the walls of the chapel. - Belgium - early resistance - press - Group Erkens - priest - Petrus („Piet“) Johannes Cornelis Muhren was not a resistance fighter in the Dutch province of Limburg, but was in close contact with them and therefore also appears on this list. His German ancestors still wrote "Mühren", but in Dutch it is pronounced the same way.He entered the novitiate of the Dutch Cistercian Abbey of Mariënkroon in 1929 as Brother Canisius, but in 1933 he moved to the short-staffed Abbey of Val-Dieu in Aubel, Belgium, just over the border of Dutch South Limburg. There he received the monastic name Stephen (French: Étienne). He was ordained a priest in Val-Dieu on July 5, 1936. He was cantor for the next years and taught ecclesiastical law, dogmatics and philosophy at the internal teaching institution. When the Wehrmacht invaded in 1940, he initially fled to the west, distrusting his German abbot, but then returned and joined the Resistance with his confrere Hugo Jacobs. Through the general practitioner Jules Goffin, they came into contact with the intelligence and resistance network Clarence and the Erkens group. He observed the transports of the German army on the railroad lines in the area on extended bicycle tours and explained these tours with visits to women in need of pastoral help, which earned him the nickname Père Amoureux.
Val-Dieu and Voeren are located in the middle of the Liège-Maastricht-Aachen three-country triangle and were therefore virtually predestined as a hub for escape networks. Apart from monitoring German railroad activity, the two monks also hid fugitives in the monastery and on the surrounding farms of the border area. They were sustained discreetely by their German abbot Alberich Steiger, who, among other things, dined with high German officers. He and his confrere, together with Pol Nolens, vicar at Charneux, edited an illegal newspaper, reproduced with a spirit duplicator at Charneux, denouncing the misdeeds of National Socialism in the three Belgian languages (La Tribune Libre in French, Het Vrije Woord in Dutch, and Das Freie Wort in German).
On March 18, 1943, one day before Fr. Hugo, he was arrested by the Geheime Feldpolizei (Secret Police of the German army) as a result of the Hannibal Game. On August 11, 1943, he and ten others were sentenced to death by a court-martial in Utrecht for espionage and favoring the enemy. They were shot at Fort Rijnauwen near Utrecht (Netherlands) on October 9, 1943. On the way to the execution site, he and his confrere wore their white Cistercian monk’s robes and loudly sang a religious hymn. His body was cremated, and the ashes were later buried in the Val-Dieu monastery cemetery. A memorial plaque commemorates him in Fort Rijnauwen and in the abbey church of Val-Dieu.
This person is not (yet?) listed on the walls of the chapel.02-04
Naus,
Jacobus Johannes
Van Doorn /Jac
∗ 1913-12-31
Egchel
† 1945-04-15
Bergen-Belsen
Venlo - L.O. - priest - person in hiding - carillon - On June 6, 1939, Jac Naus was appointed vicar in the parish of St. Martinus in Venlo. There, together with Ambrosius and his colleague P.G. van Enckevort, he was one of the founders of the LO. Dr. Fred Cammaert said in his speech at the unveiling of the memorial plaque at the Peace Carillon:
“Vicar Jacques Naus from Venlo was not only a pioneer of the resistance, he was also an outspoken representative of the humanitarian resistance. He was involved early on in helping escaped prisoners of war and crew members of downed Allied bombers. He was also one of the initiators behind the founding of the Limburg organization for help to people in hiding in 1943. Like Jan Hendrikx, he made numerous connections and held a leading position in the organization. Due to the raid of Weert on June 21, 1944, it fell into German hands. He died in Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in early 1945.
wall: right, row 29-04
Oppen, van
Jules Louis Antoine
∗ 1882-05-10
Maastricht
† 1943-02-16
Vught
Venlo - early resistance - priest - Dean Jules van Oppen was the first clergyman in Venlo and all of Limburg to pay for his resistance with death. After the German invasion on May 10, 1940, he opposed the German films that were shown in the cinemas of Venlo. According to the Church, they were immoral and anti-patriotic. The Germans took him to task several times for his film recommendations. However, the dean was not deterred by this. So he was arrested in September 1942 after his warning against the film Kora Terry starring Marika Rökk, which was shown in Venlo cinemas in May 1942, and ended up in the concentration camp in Amersfoort, from where he was taken to Vught on January 16, 1943. He died there on February 16 or 17. (Source: Gemeentearchief Venlo)
Three priests of the catholic Martinus Church paid for their resistance with their lives. On the memorial plaque at this church we find their names and also that of the Protestant priest Henk de Jong.
wall: right, row 30-04
Penders,
Leo
∗ 1914-07-01
Voerendaal
† 1945-04-24
Bergen-Belsen
Gulpen - Voerendaal - L.O. - priest - Vicar Leon Marie Hubert Penders headed subdistrict 2 of the LO with the places Gulpen, Reymerstok and Wylré. (See map 45. Gulpen district: division into subdistricts. Cammaert VIb, p. 693) and determined the district’s financial policy from 12 January 1944. On July 21, 1944, Vicar Penders and J.H. Ortmans of Wahlwiller were arrested (Cammaert VI, p. 654) and shortly thereafter ten other leaders of the Gulpen district. This action would later become known as "Klap van Wittem" (Strike of Wittem).
wall: left, row 12-01
Peters,
Piet
∗ 1912-11-27
Ottersum
† 1945-04-06
Buchenwald
Tegelen - L.O. - priest - person in hiding - Father Petrus Nicolaas Andreas Peters was a member of the L.O. Steyl and vicar. Pastor P.P. Windhausen, himself and three others from Steyl and Tegelen went into hiding in the tower room of the Steyl church and later moved into the basement. There they listened to the BBC programs they typed them to update others on developments on the front lines. The arrival of a German observer, who settled in the tower room, threw a spanner in the works. Their activities came to light. The five eventually ended up in Düsseldorf. Before their deportation to Buchenwald, Kluitmans and two clergymen from Roermond, the Catholic vicar A.J.A. Sars and the Reformed pastor H.Ch.J. Hoogendijk were added to this group. All but two were killed: Windhausen died in Buchenwald on March 28, Peters on April 6, and Hoogendijk on April 10. Kluitmans died in Dachau in April, Sars died in Passau on April 23, and H.J.A. Hovens from Tegelen succumbed to the hardships he had endured in Buchenwald on April 10, 1947. (Cammaert IV, p. 302)
wall: right, row 22-01
Ramakers,
V.L.Servaas
∗ 1906-04-23
Schinnen
† 1945-03-09
Bergen-Belsen
Heerlen - L.O. - priest - Vicar in Heerlerheide. Arrested by the Landwacht on August 18, 1945. See Cammaert VIb, p. 665 and "Vier dont ut zelf - 150 jaar geschiedenis van een parochie" (150 years history of a parish). The Kapelaan Ramakersstraat behind the church in Heerlerheide is named after him.
wall: left, row 16-04
Regout,
Robert
∗ 1896-01-18
Maastricht
† 1942-12-28
Dachau
This person is not (yet?) listed on the walls of the chapel. - Maastricht - early resistance - priest - Robert Hubert Willem Regout was a Jesuit and legal scholar. In 1934, he received his doctorate from the University of Nijmegen on the doctrine of “just war”. From 1939 he was an associate professor of international law there. During the occupation, he provided information everywhere on the constraints of international law to which any occupying power had to adhere, e.g., in a June 1940 article De rechtstoestand in bezet gebied (The Legal Situation in Occupied Territory) on the Hague Land Warfare Regulations, original text see link below. He was feared by the occupiers for his attitude, agitation, and expertise, and was arrested in late June 1940.
This person is not (yet?) listed on the walls of the chapel.04-24
Rijnders,
Harrie
Harrie
∗ 1914-12-29
Swalmen
† 1942-09-14
Dachau (D)
Beesel - priest - Hendrikus Leonardus Hubertus Rijnders was chaplain in Saint Quentin and pastor in Gricourt. Arrested on July 17th, 1941 while on vacation at his parents’ in Reuver. With 150 other prisoners he was gassed. On April 17, 1948 the city council of Reuver decided to call a street after him.
In memoriam card
wall: left, row 03-01
Sars,
Adrianus Johannes Albertus
∗ 1905-12-26
’s-Hertogenbosch
† 1945-04-23
Passau.
Roermond - L.O. - priest - Vicar at the cathedral of Roermond. With the arrival of a paratrooper battalion under the command of Major Ulrich Matthaeas, a somber, ominous atmosphere arose in Roermond. The major complained to his superiors that the male population was a danger to his soldiers. One of his subordinates, F.W. Held, exercised a real terror on the inhabitants of Roermond in December. He was assisted by two residents who gave him all sorts of tips. On December 17, vicar Sars fell into the hands of F.W. Held. Sars and Held had clashed earlier. Held had been waiting for a suitable moment to arrest Sars. (Cammaert VIb, p. 621)
He was put on transport to Buchenwald with a group of around the Catholic parish priest Windhausen from Steyl, Leo Kluitmans and the Protestant pastor H.Ch.J. Hoogendijk from Roermond to Buchenwald.
See also The Tears of Roermond.
wall: right, row 10-02
Verdonschot,
Leonardus Mattheus
Leo
∗ 1916-07-24
Weert
† 1945-03-02
Bergen-Belsen
Echt - L.O. - priest - Vicar Verdonschot began his resistance work by helping French-speaking prisoners of war who had escaped from Germany. They were taken to Belgium via Wessem/Maasbracht-Stevensweert. (Cammaert III, p. 195) Since the summer of 1943 he led the L.O. in Koningsbosch and for this purpose he was in contact with A. Engelen in Echt, chaplain P.A.H. Römkens in Pey-Echt and father Bleijs in Roermond. (Cammaert VIb p. 626.)
Arrested in the church during a large-scale action on February 23, 1944, as a result of the carelessness of a 17-year-old German hider. “Verdonschot was deported from Vught to Sachsenhausen in early September 1944. In February 1945 he arrived in Bergen-Belsen severely weakened, where he died on March 2, 1945.” (Cammaert VIb p. 627.)
wall: left, row 06-05
Vullinghs,
Hendrik Jacob
Henri
∗ 1883-09-14
Sevenum
† 1945-04-09
Bergen-Belsen
Grubbenvorst - early resistance - L.O. - priest - Catholic parish priest of Grubbenvorst and building parish priest in Grashoek, studied musicology in Italy and the United States. He was known as a very open-minded and culturally enthusiastic person. Already during 1941 and 1942, he began to help Jews in collaboration with the Amsterdam journalist and social democrat Mathieu Smedts, a native of the Peel village Grashoek, and his chaplain Jean Slots. An escape route was established from Amsterdam to Switzerland and hiding places were found in northern Limburg. Even after the arrest of Smedts (who survived the camps), contact with the Social Democratic group in Amsterdam was maintained. (Cammaert V, p. 423).
After the founding of the LO in 1943, Vullinghs and his group also joined. He led the local group together with H. Joosten. On May 1, 1944, Vullinghs was arrested on the street in front of the church.
According to Loe de Jong, he was one of the biggest organizers of help for pilots and people in hiding in the whole province of Limburg. The Jewish composer Hans Lachman from Berlin, who was in hiding in Grubbenvorst, wrote a Catholic requiem in honor of Father Vullinghs, probably in the 1950s.
wall: left, row 11-03
Windhausen,
Peter
∗ 1892-06-29
Roermond
† 1945-03-28
Buchenwald
Tegelen - priest - person in hiding - Petrus Paulus Windhausen (Catholic parish priest in Steyl-Tegelen), vicar P.N.A. Peters and three other people from Steyl and Tegelen had hidden in the tower room of the church in Steyl and later moved to the basement. There they listened to broadcasts from the B.B.C., which they typed up to inform others of developments on the fronts. The arrival of a German guard post who nested in the tower room threw everything out of whack, and their activities came to light. The five eventually ended up in Düsseldorf. Before their transport to Buchenwald, Kluitmans and two Roermond clergymen, vicar A.J.A. Sars and the Protestant pastor H.Ch.J. Hoogendijk were added to this group. All but two have died: Windhausen died in Buchenwald on March 28, Peters on April 6, and Hoogendijk on April 10. Kluitmans died in Dachau in April, Sars died in Passau on April 23, and H.J.A. Hovens of Tegelen succumbed to the rigors of Buchenwald on April 10, 1947. (Cammaert IV, p. 302)
wall: right, row 22-04