The fallen resistance fighters in the dutch province of Limburg
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The fallen resistance fighters in the dutch province of Limburg

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Order Service (O.D.)



Proclamation of the O.D.

Order Service (O.D.) – 14 pers.   ⇒All the fallen resistance people in Limburg
Bongaerts,
Charles M.H.J.
∗ 1909-08-07
Venlo
† 1944-11-23
KZ Ladelund, KZ Neuengamme
Heerlen - early resistance - press - Ordedienst - Netw. Bongaerts - police - Married to Trees (Theresa) Dahmen. In 1940 Charles was a reserve officer in the Dutch army and during the five day battle of the Netherlands he fought on the so called “Grebbenberg Line”, that the Dutch army held to the very end, repulsing heavy assaults from the German forces. After this, Charles Bongaerts was the head of the fire service in Heerlen, center of the coal mining area and this gave him access to vehicles which enabled him to play a prominent part in the underground resistance. They put up airmen in their home and transported them south on the long journey to England via Belgium, France and Gibraltar or Switzerland. On one occasion Charles Bongaerts stopped a German convoy and, claiming to be on urgent business, got a mechanic to repair his vehicle while three American airmen were in the back. Source Joseph Marie Phillipe Bongaerts DFC, FC, OHK1
Before the war, he used to be a journalist at the daily newspaper Limburgsch Dagblad in Heerlen. Together with some others, he founded the resistance newspaper Het Vrije Volk (The Free People), not to be confused with the same-named post-war newspaper. It was directed mainly at miners and was very well informed, because they had their people everywhere, even at the SiPo in Maastricht! (Cammaert XI, p. 1077).
His group was infiltrated in 1944 (Englandspiel), Charles was betrayed too and died in a German concentration camp on the 23 November 1944.
wall: left, row 16-01
Bouman,
Martinus
Bob
∗ 1899-05-05
Gouda
† 1943-05-02
Maastricht
Roermond - CCD - early resistance - Ordedienst - april/may strike - Martinus Antonius Marie Bouman was a first lieutenant in the KNIL (Dutch Colonial Army), then chief controller with the C.C.D. in Limburg and East Brabant. He helped downed Allies and prisoners of war who had escaped from Germany. In 1940 and 1941 still on his own, then with R.H. van de Vin from Neeritter and Pastor Vullinghs from Grubbenvorst. Through the Group Erkens they got a larger network. The miners’ strike was his undoing. See also the article: When the miners went on strike against the German occupiers. Knight Militaire Willems-Orde 4th class.
More in our story Resistance in Valkenburg
wall: right, row 04-04
Groot,
Simon Petrus
Jan
∗ 1924-05-15
Alkmaar
† 1944-09-20
Sevenum
Sevenum - Ordedienst - Office clerk. The farm “Rust Roest” of family Groot in Sevenum was a source of resistance during the war. People in hiding were housed there and the resistance met here regularly. On Wednesday 20 September 1944, three Germans arrived on the scene and a firefight ensued. Not only two Germans died, but also Simon Petrus Groot (20 years old) and his cousin Simon Stendert Groot (33 years old) were hit by bullets and died of their injuries.
wall: right, row 14-03
Hoof, van
Jan Jozef Lambert
Redder van de Waalbrug
∗ 1922-08-07
Nijmegen
† 1944-09-19
Nijmegen
This person is not (yet?) listed on the walls of the chapel. - Nijmegen - dutch soldier - L.O. - Ordedienst - The outskirts of Limburg - On September 19, 1944, Jan van Hoof guided an Allied reconnaissance vehicle through the city. On the Nieuwe Markt - today’s Joris Ivensplein - the vehicle was shot on fire. Jan van Hoof survived, but was caught by German soldiers and subsequently killed by gunshot to the head.
Posthumously he was awarded the Militaire Willemsorde (MWO, Knight 4th Class)
This person is not (yet?) listed on the walls of the chapel.
Jans,
Katie
∗ 1923-07-24
Venlo
† 1945-01-06
Venlo
- Venlo - L.O. - - Ordedienst - person in hiding - She was a daughter of reserve Major General Jacobus Jans, commander of the OD in Limburg, and the sister of his successor Leo Jans. The latter, after his arrest, was taken out of his cell again by a group of resistance fighters from Venlo. In revenge for this, his sisters Trees and Katie were arrested. After several days of "interrogation" about the whereabouts of their brother and father, the girls were released. Katie died in the hospital of Venlo "as a result of wartime violence" (Gemeentearchief Venlo).
wall: right, row 29-01
Mennen,
Jan
∗ 1918-10-13
Roggel
† 1944-09-27
Roggel
Roggel - Ordedienst - Johannes Joseph Mennen was a baker. Picture of the memorial plaque at the monument in Roggel, which reads: “This monument was erected in memory of the resistance fighters Jan Muis and Jan Mennen. On September 26, 1944, they went by bicycle, together with a resistance comrade Frits Coenen, to relieve the guards in the forest. In the forest at that moment there was a German soldier who was a prisoner of war. On their way, they were coincidentally stopped by two German soldiers. Less than 100 meters in front of them, two more German soldiers were lying in the ditch along the road with their rifles at the ready. Suddenly, shots were heard. Frits Coenen managed to escape. Jan Muis and Jan Mennen were killed…”. Cammaert writes (Ch. 8, p. 898), "J.P.N. Muis, J.J. Mennen and G. Coenen set out for the cellar on Tuesday, September 26, to relieve the guard. German paratroopers searching the area at the same time noticed the three and took them under fire. Coenen escaped, but Muis was fatally shot. Mennen suffered a shot in the lungs and was taken to the hospital in Roermond, where he died the next day.”
wall: right, row 11-04
Muis,
Johan /Jan
∗ 1914-08-28
Venray
† 1944-09-26
Roggel
Roggel - Ordedienst - Johannes Petrus Nicolaas Muis graduated from the Gymnasium I.C. of the Franciscans in Venray in 1928 and then attended the Kweekschool (teacher education) Kleine Beek in Venlo. On March 1, 1936, he became a teacher at the Catholic boys’ school "Sint Jozef" in Roggel. Also active with a boys choir and as a scout leader. Head of the OD (Ordedienst) in Roggel.
Picture of the plaque at the monument in Roggel, which says: “This monument was erected in memory of the resistance fighters Jan Muis and Jan Mennen. On September 26, 1944, together with resistance comrade Frits Coenen, they were on a bicycle to relieve the guards in the forest. In the forest at that moment there was a German soldier who was a prisoner of war. On their way, they happened to be stopped by two German soldiers. Less than 100 meters in front of them, two more German soldiers were lying in the ditch along the road with their rifles at the ready. Suddenly, shots were heard. Frits Coenen managed to escape. Jan Muis and Jan Mennen were killed. …". Cammaert writes (Chapter VIII, p. 898): “J.P.N. Muis, J.J. Mennen and G. Coenen made their way to the cellar on Tuesday, September 26, to relieve the guard. German paratroopers searching the area at the same time noticed the three and took them under fire. Coenen escaped, but Muis was fatally shot. Mennen suffered a shot in the lungs and was taken to the hospital in Roermond, where he died the next day.”
wall: right, row 11-05
Plitscher,
Chris
∗ 1907-09-15
Susteren
† 1944-11-11
Wassenberg, D
Susteren - L.O. - Ordedienst - Chris was a shunter at the railroad company. “In Susteren, the same people worked for both the O.D. and the L.O.. At first Father Bleijs from Roermond asked railroad official J. van Riet, in consultation with vicar F. Dusée, to set up the L.O. in the sub-district of Echt, Koningsbosch, Ohé en Laak, Roosteren and Susteren. Van Riet considered himself unsuitable for this task, but he found enough helpers. These were mainly OD people like W.A. Meuffels and Ch. Plitscher.” (Cammaert VIb, p. 628)
wall: right, row 20-05
Reulen,
Albert
Bèr
∗ 1916-11-12
Roermond
† 1944-06-10
Overveen
Roermond - L.O. - K.P. - Ordedienst - Butcher, factory worker and involved in the resistance groups Ordedienst (OD), Landelijke Organisatie voor Hulp aan Onderduikers (LO) and the KP (knokploegen, armed groups) of Roermond and later of Alkmaar, behause Reulen and J.P.H. Frencken moved their area of operations to North Holland in January 1944. See Cammaert VII.II.2. De knokploegen van Helden en Roermond, pp. 767-768. Reulen was arrested on 22 May 1944 and executed in the dunes after his imprisonment in the Weteringschans prison in Overveen.
Report of the Higher SS and Police Chief ‘Nordwest’: “The Police Court has sentenced the following Dutchmen to death: Factory worker Albert Reulen from Roermond and welder Jacobus Frenken from Maasniel. The convicts had participated as members of a terrorist group in the armed robberies of the town hall in Haelen on February 13, 1944, the town hall in Venhuizen on March 18, 1944, and the town hall in Heiloo on May 12, 1944. Food coupons, money, forms for identity cards and other things were stolen in quite large numbers. During the raid on the town hall in Venhuizen, one of the perpetrators shot at the resisting police officer. Thus the convicts are guilty of participation in a clandestine organization, continued sabotage and unauthorized possession of firearms.”
Kruis van Verdienste (Dutch Cross of Merit).
Sources
WO2 Biografieën Netwerk Oorlogsbronnen
Gevallenen Roermond – Achtergrond verhalen (background stories).
Listed on the Oorlogsmonument (war memorial) Roermond.
wall: right, row 10-01
Saive,
Jozef
∗ 1924-04-23
Vaals
† 1945-03-20
Vaals
This person is not (yet?) listed on the walls of the chapel. - Vaals - dutch soldier - Ordedienst - Jozef (nickname Jeu, pronounce Yö) Saive is described by some sources as a resistance fighter, but his name is not on the wall of the memorial chapel on the Cauberg because he was too young to join the resistance during the occupation (20 when he died). But shortly after the liberation of South Limburg he died fighting against National Socialism as a member of the OD (Grenswachtcompagnie Maastricht II, platoon Gulpen) and therefore he is also on this list.
He served on the Dutch-Belgian border near Wolfhaag, south of Vaals, and was just talking to his girlfriend during a patrol when he noticed a group of suspicious people. They were members of the "Werwolf" terrorist group who were on their way on order of Himmler to assassinate the Mayor of Aachen, Franz Oppenhoff, who had been appointed by the Allies. Jeu ran after them while his girlfriend went to get help. He was shot in an exchange of fire and died shortly thereafter.
The Werwolf commando had been dropped out of a captured American B-17 (Flying Fortress) aircraft over the Belgian border area. Why there? The region had been liberated in September 1944. German infiltrants were more likely to be expected from the east. The werewolves apparently used the old smuggling route along the B-NL border on their way to Aachen via the 3 borders point. When Dutch customs officers came, the smugglers ued to switch to the Belgian side and vice versa. Behind the 3 borders point in Germany begins the Aachen Forest, which stretches south along the whole of Aachen and from which Oppenhoff’s house was easily accessible. A few days later, on March 25, 1945, he was murdered. See the Open Street Map link below.
This person is not (yet?) listed on the walls of the chapel.04-25
Stad, van der
Nicolaas
∗ 1890-02-07
Nijmegen
† 1942-05-11
Oranienburg
This person is not (yet?) listed on the walls of the chapel. - Maastricht - press - Ordedienst - Cellist, muziekleraar, directeur Muziek Lyceum Amsterdam en Nijmeegsche Volksmuzieschool. Oprichter O.D. en Parool in Nijmegen. Zat in de landelijke OD-top. gearresteerd op 4 oktober 1941. Waarschijnlijk gefusilleerd in kamp Sachsenhausen te Oranienburg.


This person is not (yet?) listed on the walls of the chapel.-
Stoffels,
Marcel
Starkenborg
∗ 1914-06-27
Brunssum
† 1944-08-11
Vught
Brunssum - L.O. - Ordedienst - person in hiding - Marcel Elbert Jozef Marie Stoffels was an employee in an office. After a period of resistance activities in Apeldoorn, he went into hiding in Roermond when the members of the Dutch army were to be taken prisoner of war again.Through the mediation of Father Ludovicus Adrianus Bleijs (Lodewijk), he came into contact with the engineer Commandant Jules Dewez of the OD district of Roermond. Stoffels became his adjutant. He also acted as a courier for Secretary Moonen of the Diocese of Roermond (Uncle Leo) and helped stranded Allied pilots, distributed illegal writings, and took care of issuing false identity cards. Together with Roermond-based Jan Dahmen and Jacob Janssen, he became a victim of infiltration by V-man Joop de Heus. On June 9, 1944, the SD arrested him in Den Bosch.
wall: left, row 06-02
Tobben,
Harrie /Harry
∗ 1917-08-24
Heerlen
† 1945-03-15
Hameln (D
Heerlen - early resistance - press - Ordedienst - Netw. Bongaerts - police - carillon - Former soldier and after his demobilization by the Germans in 1940 member of the mine police. Was involved, among other things, in acts of sabotage in the Oranje-Nassau Mine I (O.N. I) in Heerlen, which was uncovered by the SiPo. In June 1942, on the advice of police friends, he went into hiding in Baexem, but just continued to help fugitives. From the speech by Dr. Fred Cammaert at the unveiling of the memorial plaque at the Peace Carillon): “Under the inspiring leadership of Charles Bongaerts, he and other former military personnel devoted themselves to all manner of resistance activities, ranging from aiding Jews, Allied airmen, and those in hiding (the so called divers), to gathering weapons and intelligence information, to producing and distributing illegal magazines and acts of sabotage. As a result of infiltrating by provocateurs in German service, he was arrested on August 6, 1943.”
wall: left, row 19-05
Veerman,
Christiaan Jac.
Lou
∗ 1887-07-27
Kesteren
† 1945-01-17
Siegburg (D)
Geleen - press - Ordedienst - Former soldier and after his demobilization overseer in the state mine Maurits in Geleen. He was in contact with the OD group in Heerlen and Charles Bongaerts and thus became a member of the network that published the Limburg resistance newspaper Het Vrije Volk, not to be confused with the same-named post-war daily newspaper. It was directed mainly at miners and was very well informed, because they had their people everywhere, even at the SiPo in Maastricht! The demand for this magazine was much greater than the 30 to 50 copies Veerman got from Heerlen, so they printed at least another hundred copies themselves. Many of the Geleen team of the journal, including Veerman, were arrested as a result of treason, probably by the sister-in-law of one of the members of this team. (Cammaert XI, p. 1077)
He died as a forced laborer after nearly four years in captivity. See also his death certificate. Lies on the Nationaal Ereveld (National Field of Honor) in Loenen. In Geleen, a street is named after him.
wall: left, row 09-05