The fallen resistance fighters in the dutch province of Limburg
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The fallen resistance fighters in the dutch province of Limburg

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Peace Carillon


Wikimedia

 

Wikimedia

The peace carillon consists of ten bronze bells, together weighing 611 kilograms. All bells bear a name and a line from the text that the poet Willem K. Coumans wrote especially for this carillon.
The heaviest bell is named after the main donor of the carillon, Vincent Simone. On the 9 other bells are the names of fallen resistance fighters from Limburg.
https://kunstencultuurraad.nl/cultureel-erfgoed/verzetsmonument-cauberg.html
See the speech of Dr. Fred Cammaert on the occasion of the unveiling of the plaque at the peace carillon

Peace Carillon – 9 pers.   ⇒All the fallen resistance people in Limburg
Coenen,
Sjeng
∗ 1915-01-10
Simpelveld
† 1944-09-05
Valkenburg
Simpelveld - L.O. - K.P. - person in hiding - carillon - Former subdistrictleader of Simpelveld. Cammaert: “After the betrayal of Wittem, J.H. Coenen from Simpelveld and W.J. Francotte from Vaals, who had worked for the illegal magazine Je Maintiendrai in Amsterdam until the summer of 1944, joined the KP. They participated in the raid on the jail of Maastricht on September 2.” They went into hiding in the Diver’s Inn in Geulhem “where suspects and difficult people in hiding were detained and interrogated. … They were arrested by the Germans on September 5th, 1944 (Mad Tuesday) during a resistance action. By order of Major Bernhardt, they were shot on the Cauberg (Valkenburg). There is a memorial stone and the monument for the fallen resistance people of Limburg on that spot.
More in our story Resistance in Valkenburg
Sjeng Coenen op de lijst van personen die tijdens de bezetting belangrijk waren voor Valkenburg.
wall: right, row 16-03
Francotte,
Joep
∗ 1920-12-29
Vaals
† 1944-09-05
Valkenburg
Vaals - L.O. - K.P. - press - person in hiding - carillon - Cammaert: “After the betrayal of Wittem, J.H. Coenen from Simpelveld and W.J. Francotte from Vaals, who had worked for the illegal magazine Je Maintiendrai in Amsterdam until the summer of 1944, joined the KP. They participated in the raid on the jail of Maastricht on September 2.” They went into hiding in the Diver’s Inn in Geulhem “where suspects and difficult people in hiding were detained and interrogated. Generally, Francotte took care of the surveillance of the “prisoners” because of his strongness. Both were arrested by the Germans on September 5th, 1944 (Mad Tuesday) during a resistance action. By order of Major Bernhardt, they were shot on the Cauberg (Valkenburg). There is a memorial stone and the monument for the fallen resistance people of Limburg on that spot.
More in our story Resistance in Valkenburg
Joep Francotte op de lijst van personen die tijdens de bezetting belangrijk waren voor Valkenburg.
wall: right, row 25-05
Guelen,
Johan
∗ 1918-10-01
Gennep
† 1944-09-08
Kamp Vught
Gennep - K.P. - carillon - Johannes Hendrikus Guelen was a machinist and worker in a paper mill. He belonged to the sabotage group KP-Noord Limburg (KP Gennep and Oeffelt). See also Jan Hendriks. Arrested in a shootout with the police. Guelen and the Hendriks brothers were taken to the police station in Berlicum. The same day they were transferred to Camp Vught, where they were to be executed. (Cammaert VIb, p. 720) In his speech at the unveiling of the plaque at the peace carillon, Cammaert said, among other things: “The somewhat lesser known Johan Guelen from Gennep had been part of the local commando group since the summer of 1944. The aim of the group was to silence traitors and chatterers and to crack down on black marketeers. In early September 1944, Guelen participated in a plan to raid the Berlicum distribution office.
Before it got to that point, he was caught through the carelessness of a colleague.”
wall: left, row 10-03
Hendrikx /Hendrickx,
Jan J.
Ambrosius
∗ 1917-02-02
Venlo
† 1945-05-03
Oranienburg/Sachsenhausen
Venlo - Nijmegen - L.O. - person in hiding - carillon - Studeerde in Nijmegen en kreeg te maken met studentenverzet, voordat hij naar Venlo terugkwam en onderwijzer werd. (Cammaert VI, p. 576) Werd er districtsleider tot zijn overgang naar het gewest en de landelijke organisatie, in de tweede helft van de zomer van 1943. (Cammaert VI, p.p. 500-501 en 579). Gearresteerd op 21-6-1944 bij overval op provinciale vergadering LO-Limburg te Weert. Dr. Fred Cammaert zei bij zijn redevoering bij de onthulling van de plaquette bij het vredescarillon: „Als tweede noem ik de uit Venlo afkomstige onderwijzer Jan Hendrikx. Op verzoek van de kapelaans Naus en Van Enckevort nam hij in 1943 de opbouw van de Limburgse onderduikorganisatie op zich. Hij reisde stad en land af en bracht talrijke waardevolle verbindingen tot stand, zowel binnen de provincie als daarbuiten. Ook maakte hij deel uit van de leiding van de landelijke onderduikorganisatie. En, net als de bij het verzet betrokken geestelijken, was hij een verklaard voorstander van geweldloos verzet. Door de overval van Weert op 21-06-1944 viel hij in Duitse handen. Begin 1945 kwam hij om het leven tijdens een van de gruwelijke evacuatietransporten van kampgevangenen.“
Drager van het Verzetskruis.
wall: right, row 28-04
Krans,
Cornelis
∗ 1887-03-30
Hoogezand
† 1944-03-02
Helmond
Helden - early resistance - L.O. - carillon - Cornelis Krans lived on a farm in Helden and early in the war he sheltered already a Jewish family in an underground hiding place just a stone’s throw from his house. When, after the strikes of April and May 1943, which included the miners’ strike, hiding took on mass dimensions, the resistance movement in Venlo came up with the idea of setting up military training camps in the forests of North and Middle Limburg. For this purpose, Krans provided some dismountable chicken coops. These were set up in the woods behind the farm. Since the people in hiding did not take their own security very seriously, all sorts of rumors soon began to circulate. The consequences of so much gossip could not fail to be felt. In July 1943, a large German contingent raided the forest camp, which could be evacuated just in time.The inhabitants got off with a fright. But not Krans. He was arrested and taken to a prison in Germany. Seriously ill, he returned to the Netherlands, where he died in March 1944. (Dr. Fred Cammaert, speech on the occasion of the unveiling of the memorial plaque at the Peace Carillon).
wall: left, row 20-05
Lokerman,
Jo S.H.
Thijs
∗ 1901-02-05
Rotterdam
† 1945-02-11
Neuengamme
Maastricht - early resistance - L.O. - press - carillon - District leader of the LO in Maastricht. Unusual in the Catholic south of the Netherlands at that time: this district leader was not only a Social Democrat, but also a reformed “Hollander”, i.e. someone from “above the rivers”. “On May 11, 1940, a group of Belgian prisoners of war was brought to the station via the Wilhelminasingel. Thijs Lokerman, a train driver from Maastricht and member of the city council for the SDAP (Social Democrats), diverted the attention of some guards by a fake brawl with a friend, so that some POWs could escape. This may have been the first act of resistance in Maastricht.” (Mestreech online).
In his speech at the unveiling of the commemorative plaque at the Peace Carillon, Dr. Fred Cammaert said, among other things: “Maastricht resident and resistance pioneer Jo Lokerman worked as an engine driver on the Dutch railroads. At the beginning of the war, he began helping French-speaking prisoners of war, and later downed Allied airmen. Lokerman used his job to distribute illegal magazines on the trains and made connections with Belgian colleagues so that British and Jewish refugees could be transported by train to France and, if possible, Switzerland and Spain." (Cammaert VIb, p. 643.) He was also one of the founders of the Maastricht LO, which he headed for a time. As a result of betrayal by brothel madam Zeguers-Boere, he fell into the hands of the SiPo on May 9, 1944. (Cammaert VIb, from page 649)
He died in Neuengamme concentration camp in February 1945.
wall: left, row 32-05
Moonen,
J. Leo
ome Leo
∗ 1895-08-31
Heerlen
† 1945-04-02
Bergen-Belsen
Roermond - L.O. - priest - carillon - Secretary of the diocese. He was the spiritual advisor and so one of the de facto leaders of the Catholic resistance in the Dutch province of Limburg. He thus also had an influence on the liquidation of traitors. In his opinion, this should be avoided as far as possible. But if it was really unavoidable, he gave his consent. On August 28, 1944, he was taken to the Herzogenbusch concentration camp, better known as camp Vught. Then he came to Bergen-Belsen via Sachsenhausen. Dr. Fred Cammaert said in his speech at the unveiling of the plaque on Peace Carillon: “Leo Moonen, Bishop Lemmens’ secretary and the driving force behind the church-inspired and stimulated nonviolent resistance. Moonen maintained close contacts with many members of the resistance movement and also acted as a source of information and as an advisor. Many turned to him when difficult decisions had to be made. For example, about the elimination of traitors. Moonen followed the resistance closely and made sure that it did not develop in an aggressive direction. The irony of fate was that in August 1944 he was betrayed by a notorious NSB member from Roermond, which at his insistence was not allowed to be liquidated. At the beginning of 1945, the spiritual leader of the Limburg resistance died in the Bergen-Belsen camp".
Bearer of the Verzetskruis 1940–1945 (Cross of Resistance, one of the highest awards in the Netherlands, was awarded only 95 times)
wall: right, row 08-03
Naus,
Jacobus Johannes
Van Doorn /Jac
∗ 1913-12-31
Egchel
† 1945-04-15
Bergen-Belsen
Venlo - L.O. - priest - person in hiding - carillon - On June 6, 1939, Jac Naus was appointed vicar in the parish of St. Martinus in Venlo. There, together with Ambrosius and his colleague P.G. van Enckevort, he was one of the founders of the LO. Dr. Fred Cammaert said in his speech at the unveiling of the memorial plaque at the Peace Carillon:
“Vicar Jacques Naus from Venlo was not only a pioneer of the resistance, he was also an outspoken representative of the humanitarian resistance. He was involved early on in helping escaped prisoners of war and crew members of downed Allied bombers. He was also one of the initiators behind the founding of the Limburg organization for help to people in hiding in 1943. Like Jan Hendrikx, he made numerous connections and held a leading position in the organization. Due to the raid of Weert on June 21, 1944, it fell into German hands. He died in Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in early 1945.
wall: right, row 29-04
Tobben,
Harrie /Harry
∗ 1917-08-24
Heerlen
† 1945-03-15
Hameln (D
Heerlen - early resistance - press - Ordedienst - Netw. Bongaerts - police - carillon - Former soldier and after his demobilization by the Germans in 1940 member of the mine police. Was involved, among other things, in acts of sabotage in the Oranje-Nassau Mine I (O.N. I) in Heerlen, which was uncovered by the SiPo. In June 1942, on the advice of police friends, he went into hiding in Baexem, but just continued to help fugitives. From the speech by Dr. Fred Cammaert at the unveiling of the memorial plaque at the Peace Carillon): “Under the inspiring leadership of Charles Bongaerts, he and other former military personnel devoted themselves to all manner of resistance activities, ranging from aiding Jews, Allied airmen, and those in hiding (the so called divers), to gathering weapons and intelligence information, to producing and distributing illegal magazines and acts of sabotage. As a result of infiltrating by provocateurs in German service, he was arrested on August 6, 1943.”
wall: left, row 19-05